Department of ClassicsUniversity of Cincinnati
Department of Classics

The University of Cincinnati Classics Department is pleased to offer two types of fellowships for study and research in the fields of philology, history, or archaeology at the John Miller Burnam Classics Library: Tytus Fellowships during the academic year, and Cincinnati Summer Residencies from May to August.

Senior scholars are invited to apply for the Margo Tytus Visiting Scholars Program. Applicants for this program will ordinarily be a minimum of five years beyond receipt of the Ph.D., with notable publication histories. Tytus Scholars are expected to be in residence at the University of Cincinnati for a minimum of one semester (ca. four months) and a maximum of two during the regular academic year; see UC Academic Calendar. In exceptional circumstances, Tytus Scholars may be appointed for a shorter term (one to two months) during the regular academic year. Tytus Scholars will receive a monthly stipend of $1,500 plus housing near campus and a transportation allowance, as well as office space attached to the Burnam Classics Library.

More recent PhDs and other scholars who would benefit from the use of a world-class classics library are invited to apply for the Cincinnati Summer Residency program. Applicants for this program will have their Ph.D. in hand by the time of application, and will ordinarily be in residence at the University of Cincinnati for approximately two months in the summer terms, May to mid-August; see UC Academic Calendar. Cincinnati Summer Residents will receive housing near campus and office space attached to the Burnam Classics Library. Residents are not eligible for a stipend or travel reimbursement.

Apart from residence in Cincinnati for the term of the relevant fellowship, the only obligation of participants in either program is to pursue their own research. They will also have access to the Klau Library at neigboring Hebrew Union College. Preference will be given to those who demonstrate a need for resources peculiar to the Burnam Classics Library or Department of Classics archives, and have not previously been able to access them. For Cincinnati Summer Residents, special consideration will be given to scholars without access to a research library through their home institutions.

The deadline for both fellowships is February 1.

The University of Cincinnati Burnam Classics Library is one of the world's premier collections in the field of Classical Studies. Comprising 269,000 volumes and a wide range of electronic resources, the library covers all aspects of the Classics: languages and literatures, history, civilization, art, and archaeology. Of special value for scholars is both the richness of the collection and its accessibility; almost any avenue of research in the classics or the post-classical Greek world can be pursued deeply and broadly under a single roof. The unusually comprehensive core collection, maintained by professional classicist librarians, is augmented by several special collections, including 15,000 nineteenth century German Programmschriften, plus extensive holdings in Palaeography, Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies. At neighboring Hebrew Union College is the Klau Library, with holdings in excess of 445,000 volumes, rich in Judaica and Near Eastern Studies.

 


The University of Cincinnati Department of Classics is pleased to announce the following Tytus Scholars for the 2017-2018 academic year:

Alexandra Karetsou (Honorary Ephor of Antiquities, Greek Ministry of Culture) "Juktas I: The Middle Minoan III Complex at Alonaki"
Stavros Kouloumentas (University of Patras) "Solon, Anaximander and the conceptualisation of justice in the archaic era"
Jackie Murray (University of Kentucky) "Read in the stars: Apollonius' Argonautica and Ptolemaic Cosmic Ideology"
Katja Piesker (AIA/DAI Fellow, DAI Berlin) "Walls within the city? A secondary set of walls in Side, Pamphylia, as a key to urban development of cities in Asia Minor"
Salvador Bartera (Mississippi State University) "A Commentary on Tacitus"
Gabriela Cursaru (University of Montréal) "Sacred Space and Time in Ancient Greek Religious Thought: Insights into the ‘Sacred Laws’"
Stephanie Roussou (Wolfson College, University of Oxford) "Theognostus' ‘Canones'"

We also have a complete list of previous recipients.